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Selecting Running Equipment

Physical Therapy in Grapevine for Running

Welcome to Grapevine Physical Therapy & Sports Medicine's resource about running - from the new runner to the experienced marathon runner.

While we often hear all we need are shoes and shorts to run, we do need a few more items to get out the door. Knowing what you need before you go shopping will help save you a lot of time and money! Selecting the right equipment is important for comfort, saftety and injury prevention.

Equipment Tips


  • Running Shoes are separated into different categories based on the way the foot is made.  Find out if you fit into a category such as Neutral, Stability, or Motion Control.
  • Your category is determined by how your foot and arch move while running.
  • For the most part, spikes and racing flats are not differentiated into categories.
  • Most running shoes have about 400-500 miles in them.  Therefore, save your running shoes only for running.
  • It is not a bad idea to have 2 pairs which you alternate.
  • Running shoes typically go up half a size over normal shoes because your feet elongate during a run.
  • Insoles will assist with minor problems and are cheaper then specialty shoes.


  • Wicking materials which move moisture away from the skin are ideal
  • Singlets, jackets, running shorts and running tights should all be purchased based on fit, not looks.
  • Cotton socks are a big cause of blisters; choose lightweight socks which also breathe
  • In colder weather, remember to layer as such:

1. Base layer should be tight fitting, next-to-skin (lighter fabric)
2. Second layer is for warmth
3. Outside layer protects against wind, water
4. Wear a hat and gloves


A hydration system (http://www.ausport.gov.au/sportscoachmag/nutrition2/pre-event_nutrition) of some sort is essential and there are plenty to choose from.

  • Hand-held with a strap to keep the bottle in place
  • Fanny pack type waist bottles
  • Backpack like units which keep the hands free and carry much more liquid


  • Reflective vests and lights for night running
  • Identification, like ROAD ID which contain your personal and medical information
  • A whistle or pepper spray (especially for women)
  • Sunglasses and hat to keep the wind, snow or sun out of your eyes and face.
  • Sunscreen and lip balm
  • Key or ID holder


  • Heart rate monitors help maintain pace
  • GPS devices will track your mileage
  • MP3 players to help you get lost in music
  • Wristwatches are essential
  • Pedometers are a little older but some still use them